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Operating Systems

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Mac OS X Lion review

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In a decade, Mac OS X evolved from a curious hybrid of the classic Mac OS and the NextStep operating system to a mainstream computer operating system used by millions. It was a decade of continual refinement, capped by the bug-fixing, internals-tweaking release of Snow Leopard in 2009.

But the last four years have seen some dramatic changes at Apple. In that time, while Mac sales have continued to grow, Apple has also built an entirely new business around mobile devices that run iOS. Combine the influx of new Mac users with the popularity of the iPhone and iPad, and you get Lion.

Can Apple make OS X friendly for people buying their first Macs and familiar to those coming to the Mac from the iPhone, while keeping Mac veterans happy? That would be a neat trick, and Apple has tried very hard to pull it off.

Before you read any further, you need to know that Lion isn't right for one particular group of users: If you're using an early Intel Mac powered by a Core Solo or Core Duo processor, you can't run it. And if you rely on PowerPC-based apps that run on Intel Macs using the Rosetta code translation technology, they won't run in Lion.

A new kind of upgrade

Even before you boot into Lion for the first time, you'll feel just how different it is from previous versions of Mac OS X. That's because Apple has decided to release the upgrade primarily as a £21 download from the Mac App Store. After a 3.5GB download, there's a new Install Lion app in your Dock and Applications folder. Double-click that, and the installation begins.

Back in the day, getting an OS X upgrade involved going to a store or ordering online and getting an optical disc. With the release of Lion, Mac users can get near-instant gratification. And the price is remarkable, in the past Apple would've charged more for an upgrade of this scale.

However, relying on downloading alone for an OS release has its drawbacks. While the experience is clean and simple for the most common installation scenarios, things can get weird if yours isn't one of them. What if you have a really slow Internet connection or a low bandwidth cap? Downloading 4GB of data could be painful. What if you aren't running Snow Leopard, which is required for the Mac App Store? What happens if your drive crashes and you have to reinstall Lion onto a new, blank hard drive?

Apple has answers to many of these questions, but the rules of the game have definitely changed. Company executives told me that users without access to a high speed connection will be able to bring their Macs to an Apple Store for help in buying and installing Lion. And despite all the talk about Lion being available only via the Mac App Store, the company plans to release a version of Lion on a USB stick in August.

Apple doesn't provide an easy way to burn a DVD or format a USB drive as a backup installer, though even Apple execs admitted that technically adept users will be able to figure out how to create a bootable installer from the contents of the Lion installation package. Wiping your hard drive entirely and re-installing Lion will be a different (and potentially more complicated) process than it is today with Snow Leopard, but for most users installing (and restoring) system software under Lion will be a simpler process.

The good news is that, once you've got a Lion installer, you can copy it freely to all the Macs in your house (so long as they're running the latest version of Snow Leopard) and upgrade them to Lion. Not only is that convenient, but it's legal: The Lion download licence covers all of the Macs in your household, making that £21 an even greater deal.

If you're planning on updating multiple Macs to Lion, though, be warned: the Lion installation app self-destructs after use. After you download it, move a copy somewhere else before installing, or you'll have to re-download the installer from the App Store before using it on another Mac.

Scrolling and gesturing

Apple has been adding multi-touch gestures to OS X since the introduction of two-finger scrolling in the PowerBook in 2005. After the arrival of the iPhone in 2007, things really picked up steam. In 2008 MacBooks got a multi-touch glass trackpad, and in 2010 Apple brought the same gestures to the desktop with the Magic Trackpad. With Lion, gestures are now front and centre, and it'll be interesting to see how users react.

For some users, gestures are already second nature. I can't imagine using my MacBook without two-finger scrolling. As someone who uses the Desktop to store all of the files I'm currently working on, the four-finger flicking gesture that clears away all windows so I can see that Desktop is now burned into my muscle memory. To do that in Lion, you now flick with three or four fingers and your thumb.

But for others, gestures are completely foreign. When I mention two-finger scrolling to some people, they look at me like I'd just claimed that I'd been to the moon. For the record: if you slide two fingers up and down on a trackpad, it's just like you were spinning a mouse's scroll wheel. Try it, it's great!

It's true that gestures can be tricky to learn. Some feel natural, because the result mimics the gesture, the three- or four-finger flick that moves your windows out of the way and summons Mission Control, the three-finger sideways slide that moves you from one space to another and the new four or five-finger spread that reveals the Desktop. Others are less intuitive. The two-finger double-tap that provides an iPhone-like zoom, for example, or the double-tap with three fingers (not the triple-tap with two fingers) that produces a popup dictionary definition of any word onscreen. Nifty features both, but tough to remember.

Lion also dramatically changes the two-finger scroll. That's because Apple has decided to change directions.

In previous versions of OS X, if you slid two fingers upwards on a trackpad (or moved the scrollbar on the side of the window up), your view of a document moved up. The document on the screen seemed to move down, and you would see content higher up on the page. In Lion, if you push those two fingers up, it's as if you're physically pushing the document up, you see the content below what had been onscreen.

Apple says that after a few days of using OS X with this new behaviour, your brain adapts and then you won't be able go back to doing it the other way. It's true, after three or four days, I was comfortable with the new scrolling orientation. If you're willing to put up with a few days of weirdness, your mind will adapt. If you can't, well, go to the Scroll & Zoom tab in the Trackpad preference pane and uncheck the Scroll With Finger Direction option. That will restore the old scrolling behaviour.

Users of desktop Macs who don't like trackpads will be grumpy about the change. Fortunately for them, you don't need a trackpad to use Lion, most of the features you implement via gestures can also be activated using keyboard shortcuts or contextual menus.

With this change, Apple is syncing the behaviour between the iOS and the Mac. Is it really necessary for the two platforms to be in sync? Right now, I'd say no. But it does make me wonder whether Apple is laying the groundwork for more crossover between the two operating systems. If someday there's a touchscreen Mac or one that can run iOS apps natively, having a consistent scroll-direction philosophy will make sense. For now, though, if it hurts your brain too much, you can just turn it off.

Speaking of scrolling, scroll bars, and crossover between the Mac OS and iOS, Lion also introduces the biggest change to scroll bars since they were introduced with the original Mac in 1984.

By default, scroll bars on Lion are invisible, just as they are in iOS. You see nothing on the right side of a document window until you begin to scroll with a trackpad or mouse. Only then does the scroll bar appear. When it does, it's clickable and draggable. You can even move your cursor above or below the bar itself and click in a light-gray scroll lane to jump rapidly through a document. But when not in use, the scrollbar fades away.

As someone who has fully embraced the concept of scrolling via two fingers on a trackpad, I like this approach. I didn't use that scroll bar space and generally don't need to see it. But as with so many of the changes Apple is making in Lion, the company gives users who like the old way an out. In the General pane of the System Preferences app, there's an option to always show scroll bars.

If you like to click on those arrow buttons at the top and/or bottom of the old scrollbars, though, you're out of luck. They're gone completely. I can't remember the last time I used them, so that doesn't bother me.



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Comments

Totalapps said: httpwwwtotalappsnetrevieMac operaing systems are sort of tehno art for me thanks for the review

jescott418 said: How many Mac users can figure out how to burn a disc Especially now that the Mini has no optical the Macbook Air has none I know of many Mac users who hardly know how to repair permissions or uninstall programs Especially those coming from Windows Apple to me has just made the switch harder by creating a new way to navigate through gestures As a long time Mac user myself I find it not natural and hard to get used too I also dislike Apple trying to make a computer desktop look like my iPad Why should I buy a Mac if its just going to behave like a cheaper iPad In the end maybe that is what Apple wants Its obvious that the iPad is most likely their cash cow right now The Macs are along for the ride You talk about older Intel Macs are excluded from upgrading to Lion But you fail to mention that even some that can upgrade dont have the multi gesture touchpad My daughters 2008 White Macbook is one of those I have to ask myself why even bother with Lion I think Apple priced Lion cheap because it knew that it was just a refresh over Snow Leopard and a little eye candy goes a long way in Apple fans eyes But Windows has had full screen Windows for a long time and the rest of what Apple has done is just not critical

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